Tech

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“The Augmented Reality Sandbox (orginally developed by researchers at UC Davis) lets users sculpt mountains, canyons and rivers, then fill them with water or even create erupting volcanoes. This version of the device at UCLA was built by Gary Glesener using off-the-shelf parts and good ol’ playground sand. Any shape made in the sandbox is detected by an Xbox Kinect sensor and processed with open source software. It is then projected as a color-coded contour map onto the sand. Can’t get enough of this. Augmented reality is just ridiculous. These are the types of engaging technological applications we should have integrated into schools for hands-on science engagement to learn about geology, geophysics, and planetary science!”


Showcasing YOUR amazing talent – via SDID²

Showcasing YOUR amazing talent – via SDID²

“Project Jacquard is a new system for weaving technology into fabric, transforming everyday objects, like clothes, into interactive surfaces. Project Jacquard will allow designers and developers to build connected, touch-sensitive textiles into their own products. This is just the beginning, and we’re very excited to see what people will do with it.”


Showcasing YOUR amazing talent – via SDID²

Via ProstheticKnowledge: Computational Hydrographic Printing Method developed at Columbia University can accurately apply a print designed for specific surface shape from flat printouts. Interesting to note that this method can compliment 3D Printing with a standard home printer: Hydrographic printing is a well-known technique in industry for transferring color inks on a thin film to the surface of a manufactured 3D object. It enables high-quality coloring of object surfaces and works with a wide range of materials, but suffers from the inability to accurately register color texture to complex surface geometries. Thus, it is hardly usable by ordinary users with customized shapes and textures. We present computational hydrographic printing, a new method that inherits the versatility of traditional hydrographic printing, while also enabling precise alignment of surface textures to possibly complex 3D surfaces. More here: Computer Science Department – Columbia University

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